In the Field

Egypt’s Rebellion Against “Islamic Democracy” Back in June, I wrote an article on “The Old Regime and the Egyptian Revolution,” a takeoff of Alexis de Tocqueville’s book The Old Regime and the French Revolution, in which he described how the French Revolution failed to change the basic structure of French government, lapsing back into the […]

Comments { 1 }

The Affirmative Action Scam

An article in The New Republic explains that the Supreme Court might be on the verge of definitively banning “affirmative action” at public universities—but it also describes the high-tech method these schools are already planning to use to subvert such a ruling. After Michiganders voted in 2006 to ban the use of racial preferences in […]

Comments { 3 }

The Fiscal Cliff Agenda

In an unusually rambling piece (from which I am transmitting only the central paragraphs), George Will gets to the epistemological heart of the “fiscal cliff”: “[S]pending is the main culprit” because: Today federal revenue is $2.67 trillion (slightly less than “the Clinton equivalent”) and spending is $3.76 trillion, so we are spending $987 billion more […]

Comments { 0 }

Champions

My recent post-mortem on the Romney campaign is up at RealClearPolitics. But the point of this post-mortem is not to look backward. It is to enable us to look forward. After thinking about it a little more I can sum up the implication for the future in these terms: we desperately need champions for free […]

Comments { 0 }

Bizarro 2004

Part 2: The Man Who Wasn’t There The best analogy I have heard for the election is that it was Bizarro 2004. It’s a reference to an old plotline from Superman cartoons about a kind of alternative Earth where everything is the opposite. The idea is that this is just like the 2004 Bush vs. […]

Comments { 2 }

Bizarro 2004

Part 1: What Didn’t Cause Mitt Romney to Lose Last week, I posed three big questions about why advocates of free markets and limited government don’t seem to be able to gain support among the young, racial minorities, and city dwellers. I’m going to get to my own answers soon. In the meantime, thanks to […]

Comments { 3 }

Bondmageddon

In seeking to save the economy from the consequences of one economic bubble, the top political and economic leadership of the country has created another, more dangerous one—and hardly anyone is talking about it. In fact, some of the charlatans who pose as economic commentators are assuring us that the looming disaster is actually good […]

Comments { 5 }

Three Big Questions

I’ll be on the radio from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Eastern time this afternoon with Joe Thomas on The Daily Constitutional. The flagship station is WCHV, 107.5 FM, in Charlottesville, but the show is syndicated throughout Central Virginia, from Richmond to Roanoke, and you can find a local station or listen live online at […]

Comments { 34 }

Unions vs. Workers

As a follow-up to my recent article on the role of unions in the demise of Hostess, the venerable baker of junk-food snacks, I just came across one of the better pieces of economic reporting on this case, from the Wall Street Journal‘s Holman Jenkins. Jenkins argues that the press has been placing blame on […]

Comments { 0 }

The Parasite That Kills Its Hostess

The news about the bankruptcy of Hostess, maker of the Twinkie and other legendary junk foods, touched off some memories of growing up in a mid-sized Midwestern town in the 1970s and ’80s. No, not that kind of memory, though come to think of it, the 1980s was the last time I actually ate a […]

Comments { 1,191 }