Did We Already Get Cyprused?

In covering the proposed Cyprus bank account seizure—which fortunately was voted down by the country’s parliament—I came across an odd defense of the proposal from New York Times business writer Andrew Ross Sorkin. The essence of Sorkin’s defense was that it had been 72 hours since the proposal was announced—a whole 72 hours!—and disaster had […]

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Willie Sutton’s European Vacation

From the beginning, the European crisis has been a story of small countries on the Eurozone’s “periphery” revealing fundamental problems at the heart of the system. Now a very small country on the outer edges of the periphery—the tiny Mediterranean island of Cyprus, with about a million inhabitants and 0.02% of Europe’s GDP—is triggering the […]

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Are Objectivists Libertarians?

In my RCP newsletter, I’ve been chronicling Kentucky Senator Rand Paul’s recent heroics and ascent within the Republican Party. Paul represents, not just the influence of the Tea Party, but also the growing influence of the libertarian wing of the Republican Party, which was so famously represented by his father, Ron Paul. But if the […]

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What Is the Bible?

An Atheist Reads the Bible, Part 3 What is the Bible? I ask because I found it a little confusing for a while. In the previous installment of this series, I covered Genesis up to Noah and the flood, and I understand clearly what the purpose of that section is. It is a creation myth […]

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Anything You Can Do, iCan Do Better

In the first installment of this series, I described the emergence of a “Third Industrial Revolution” set off by the increasing integration of computers, the Internet, and information technology with manufacturing. Technology that up now has mostly been used to transmit and process information is increasingly being used to move things and make things. I […]

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Three Paradoxes of American Politics

Part 1: Getting the Blues The Republicans’ loss in November’s election has set off a particularly bitter re-evaluation of the party’s message and priorities. It is not simply that Republicans lost an election, but that they lost an election they ought to have won, given the poor performance of the economy, the continued unpopularity of […]

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Why the Oscars Were So Bad

On Sunday night, I tuned in to the Academy Awards ceremony for a change, because for the first time in a while I had a movie to root for. (Les Misérables, of course.) The evening was a bit of a disappointment on that front, particularly because I think Hugh Jackman deserves more credit as an […]

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Voting with Their Feet, and Dollars

Federalism—the independent authority over their own affairs that is retained by the states—was designed by the Founding Fathers as a counter-balance to the centralized power of the federal government. But I’m not sure they realized the full extent of its advantages. The independence of the states allows some of them to adopt policies that move […]

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The Third Industrial Revolution

We Are All Futurists Now, Part 1 I recently commented on an article about the economic rise of Africa. A more recent follow-up on that story puts the Africa boom in a very useful historical perspective. The rise of Africa’s long forlorn economies…represents the final phase of a global economic transformation that began over 200 […]

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Labor-Sucking Devices

Electric cars never really made any sense. They are cloaked in the sanctimony of the green movement, because they don’t use nasty fossil fuels like gasoline. Instead, they use electricity, which is sent out through power lines from big power plants, which generate this electricity—how? Oh yes, by burning fossil fuels like oil, coal, and […]

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