How to Achieve a Benevolent Sense of Life

Part 1: “How to Maintain a Benevolent Sense of Life in Today’s World” Many things have been written about the appeal of Ayn Rand’s novels, but one of the central reasons for her enduring popularity and influence is her concept of a “benevolent sense of life.” Her novels are not just about striving and struggle, […]

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What Are the Others Here For?

Deep down, I knew how this story was going to end. Back in November, the national news picked up a viral video of a New York City police officer buying a pair of boots for a homeless man in Times Square who was shoeless on a cold night. Everyone else thought this was a heartwarming […]

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We Will Meet the Cyborgs and They Will Be Us

We Are All Futurists Now, Part 3 For the previous installment of this series, about the coming revolution in robotics, I chose as my title a cheery takeoff on a show tune, “Anything You Can Do, iCan Do Better.” If I were to follow the favorite clichés of technology writers, I would have to choose […]

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The University Utopia

Three Paradoxes of American Politics, Part 2 Just after November’s election, I posed three paradoxes of American politics, asking why certain demographic groups make up reliable voting blocs for the left, even though the pro-free-market ideas of the right have so much to offer them. I have begun to revisit these paradoxes. In part one […]

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There’s Nobody as Dumb as a Smart Person

The problem with a reductio ad absurdum argument is that sometimes your opponent accepts the absurdity and just runs with it. When smokers were suing cigarette companies and the FDA was proposing to regulate tobacco, we thought it was a devastating retort to say, “What next, are they going to sue fast food restaurants and […]

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Did We Already Get Cyprused?

In covering the proposed Cyprus bank account seizure—which fortunately was voted down by the country’s parliament—I came across an odd defense of the proposal from New York Times business writer Andrew Ross Sorkin. The essence of Sorkin’s defense was that it had been 72 hours since the proposal was announced—a whole 72 hours!—and disaster had […]

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Willie Sutton’s European Vacation

From the beginning, the European crisis has been a story of small countries on the Eurozone’s “periphery” revealing fundamental problems at the heart of the system. Now a very small country on the outer edges of the periphery—the tiny Mediterranean island of Cyprus, with about a million inhabitants and 0.02% of Europe’s GDP—is triggering the […]

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Are Objectivists Libertarians?

In my RCP newsletter, I’ve been chronicling Kentucky Senator Rand Paul’s recent heroics and ascent within the Republican Party. Paul represents, not just the influence of the Tea Party, but also the growing influence of the libertarian wing of the Republican Party, which was so famously represented by his father, Ron Paul. But if the […]

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What Is the Bible?

An Atheist Reads the Bible, Part 3 What is the Bible? I ask because I found it a little confusing for a while. In the previous installment of this series, I covered Genesis up to Noah and the flood, and I understand clearly what the purpose of that section is. It is a creation myth […]

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Anything You Can Do, iCan Do Better

In the first installment of this series, I described the emergence of a “Third Industrial Revolution” set off by the increasing integration of computers, the Internet, and information technology with manufacturing. Technology that up now has mostly been used to transmit and process information is increasingly being used to move things and make things. I […]

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