Why the Oscars Were So Bad

On Sunday night, I tuned in to the Academy Awards ceremony for a change, because for the first time in a while I had a movie to root for. (Les Misérables, of course.) The evening was a bit of a disappointment on that front, particularly because I think Hugh Jackman deserves more credit as an […]

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Voting with Their Feet, and Dollars

Federalism—the independent authority over their own affairs that is retained by the states—was designed by the Founding Fathers as a counter-balance to the centralized power of the federal government. But I’m not sure they realized the full extent of its advantages. The independence of the states allows some of them to adopt policies that move […]

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The Third Industrial Revolution

We Are All Futurists Now, Part 1 I recently commented on an article about the economic rise of Africa. A more recent follow-up on that story puts the Africa boom in a very useful historical perspective. The rise of Africa’s long forlorn economies…represents the final phase of a global economic transformation that began over 200 […]

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Labor-Sucking Devices

Electric cars never really made any sense. They are cloaked in the sanctimony of the green movement, because they don’t use nasty fossil fuels like gasoline. Instead, they use electricity, which is sent out through power lines from big power plants, which generate this electricity—how? Oh yes, by burning fossil fuels like oil, coal, and […]

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The Man Who Isn’t There

One of President Obama’s aides once described his foreign policy as “leading from behind,” and his critics (such as myself) have derided this instead as “following from in front.” But a recent round of congressional testimony by the president’s cabinet officers reveals that the truth is even worse. Under Obama, the Leader of the Free […]

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“The Harsh Light of Modernity”

In my RCP newsletter, I just linked to an article by Pat Buchanan on the resignation of Pope Benedict XVI and the wider problems facing the Catholic Church. In 1965, three in four American Catholics attended Sunday mass. Today, it is closer to one in four. The number of priests has fallen by a third, […]

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The Metaphysical Clintons

I noted recently in my RealClearPolitics newsletter that Hillary Clinton’s departure as Secretary of State prompted a wave of flattering profiles or her in the press—which has little to do with her term as Secretary of State and a lot more to do with her potential for a future term in a higher office. But […]

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Guilt-Free Affluence

During the campaign, Mitt Romney was caught on tape telling donors that there were 47% of the public who paid no income taxes, who were (he assumed) net recipients of government largesse, and who therefore would back President Obama no matter what. Ironically, it was Romney who would get 47% of the vote, in part […]

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“Healthy Government Is Strife”

Playwright and screenwriter David Mamet caused a stir a few years back by coming out as a conservative, which is way more controversial in Hollywood than any other kind of coming out. Unfortunately, Mamet embraces conservatism for the worst reason: his belief in the inherent depravity of man (which, come to think of it, has […]

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The Economy of Illusions

Recently Mark Perry and Don Boudreaux published an article in the Wall Street Journal challenging “The Myth of a Stagnant Middle Class.” They point out that the middle class is better off than nominal measures of income might suggest, because “Household spending on food, housing, utilities, etc. has fallen from 53% of disposable income in […]

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