An Internship in Economics

For the past few years, there has been a campaign building against the use of unpaid corporate interns. It’s another little episode of middle-class Marxism, in which the college-educate bourgeoisie starts to bang on as if they were oppressed proletarians. The actual economic role of internships is pretty obvious. They offer a way for young […]

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20th Century Lite

In my RealClearPolitics newsletter, I linked to a commentator at a left-leaning publication—Slate’s John Dickerson—calling for a “healthcare.gov witch hunt.” It was an unusual recognition, or semi-recognition, that ObamaCare’s explosion on the launch pad may have some wider implications about what happens when the government sets out to manage the economy. [T]here are big national […]

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Star Trek Economics

I’ve been planning to do a follow-up to my recent article on Atlas Shrugged as a historical novel by writing about those aspects of Atlas that haven’t dated and are most relevant in today’s context. Just scanning the news will give you plenty of examples, including this one, a report in the leftist online magazine […]

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The Passive-Aggressive Citizen

Jonathan Tepperman, the managing editor of Foreign Affairs, recently announced that he has become an American citizen. Just a few days ago, in a federal courthouse in Brooklyn, I raised my right hand and—along with some 150 other immigrants from places like Bangladesh, China and the Dominican Republic—was sworn in as a U.S. citizen, something […]

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Our Problem with Prejudice

A book review in the New York Times outlines a “surprising” case against foreign aid. It is surprising only if you are a writer for the New York Times. Fred Andrews reviews The Great Escape by Angus Deaton, “an expert’s expert on global poverty and foreign aid.” The “great escape” of the title is, in […]

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The Nobel Prize for Posturing

So you’ve probably seen the news already. Last week, the Nobel Committee awarded the Nobel Peace Prize to the UN’s Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which has only just begun work in Syria in an attempt to enforce a Russian-brokered agreement to destroy the Assad regime’s chemical weapons. The Nobel Peace Prize stopped […]

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A New World

For a couple of decades now, the left has used Christopher Columbus as a punching bag and has pretty effectively suppressed the annual celebration of Columbus Day. (Not at our house. I found this great book for the kids.) So I was surprised to see a good article about the significance of Columbus and his […]

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So Who Is This John Galt Fellow, Really?

A Reader’s Guide to Atlas Shrugged, Part 4 Spoiler Alert: You do not need a reader’s guide to Atlas Shrugged—at least not for your first reading. Ayn Rand’s novel is clear, compelling, eminently readable, and perfectly comprehensible on its own terms. Yet Atlas is also a rich and complex novel, with an intricate plot in […]

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The Tracinski Letter Returns

I want to apologize for being absent from The Tracinski Letter for the past six weeks, aside from a brief and mysterious announcement several weeks ago about a special project I was working on but couldn’t announce yet. Now I can announce it. I put The Tracinski Letter on hold when I was asked to […]

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The Novel That Prevented Itself from Becoming Prophetic

Editor’s Note: My apologies for not sending out The Tracinski Letter for the past few weeks. I had a big project come up that demanded all of my time for a little while. It’s one of those things where I have been working, so far, behind the scenes, and I’m not sure when or how […]

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