Tag Archives | Ayn Rand

Followers

There is now widespread agreement that social media is a problem. In describing his hiring at The Atlantic and abrupt firing at the behest of a Twitter mob, Kevin Williamson concludes that the problem is how “the rage-fueled tribalism of social media, especially Twitter, has infected the op-ed pages and, to some extent, the rest […]

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The Operation of the Moral Law

 A Reader’s Guide to Atlas Shrugged, Part 11 Spoiler Alert: You do not need a reader’s guide to Atlas Shrugged—at least not for your first reading. Ayn Rand’s novel is clear, compelling, eminently readable, and perfectly comprehensible on its own terms. Yet Atlas is also a rich and complex novel, with an intricate plot in […]

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Philosophers: Who Needs Them

During the 2016 Republican primaries, Senator Marco Rubio somewhat notoriously declared philosophers to be less useful than welders. No, really. He was trying to make the point that our schools should do a better job at vocational education—training welders—rather than trying to push everyone to go to college. But he went a little farther than […]

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Sheriff Wesley Mouch

The shooting in Parkland, Florida, was supposed to be yet another morality tale about the evils of private gun ownership, showing us why we need to surrender our weapons to the state. It has ended up being a massive story about government incompetence and indifference, centering around Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel. It just goes […]

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Five Things You Need to Read Today

Here’s your weekly update, for subscribers only, drawing your attention to five stories that are worth catching. Today, the main theme is the search for political ideas. Any ideas. 1. “I Need Wider Powers” I’m sorry I haven’t been commenting on the news for the past week, but the Tracinski household was hit by the […]

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What We Owe John Williams

Editor’s Note: The piece below draws extensively from an article on the Olympics that I wrote in 2014.—RWT Composer John Williams turns 86 today, which by happy coincidence is the same day millions of viewers will be celebrating some of his best music: the themes he wrote for the Olympics, which have since become a […]

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The “Murder on the Orient Express” Theory of American Politics

Top Stories of the Year, #1 I have spent this week counting down the top stories of 2017. At #5 is the moral reform movement, quickly devolving into a moral panic, about sexual harassment. At #4 is the ominous new conflict between white nationalism and Communism, which worked out so well in Germany in the […]

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Why Won’t the Nightmare Dream of Communism Die?

Today marks the 100th anniversary of the October Revolution that set off the long global reign of terror of Communism. (For obscure reasons having to do with the outdated calendar used in Russia at the time, the October Revolution actually happened in November, and the Soviet Union traditionally celebrated it on November 7.) A century […]

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Five Things You Need to Read Today

Here’s your weekly update, for subscribers only, drawing your attention to five stories that are worth catching. This week, the main theme is the growth of “anti-humanism.” 1. Secular Anti-Humanism, Part 1 I remember back when conservatives used to complain about “secular humanism.” I always thought the second part, the “humanism” part, was off-base, particularly […]

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The Suicide of Liberalism

The far left, under the banner of Black Lives Matter, is protesting a campus speaker again. Who is it this time? Some neo-Nazi like Richard Spencer? An unscrupulous provocateur like Milo Yiannopoulos? Just a garden variety scary conservative like Ben Shapiro? Nope, it’s the ACLU as represented by Claire Gastañaga, Executive Director of the ACLU […]

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