Tag Archives | Ayn Rand

The Psychology of “Normal Life”

How to Achieve a Benevolent Sense of Life, Part 3 This is part three of what looks like it might be a five-part series. In the previous installment of this series, I urged readers to become flame-spotters who look for the good in the world, so that this orientation toward the good becomes the psychological […]

Comments { 1 }

Pathological Altruism

The Wall Street Journal‘s James Taranto recently linked to an academic psychologist’s report on the phenomenon of “pathological altruism”—a tentative recognition that the morality of altruism might not be as benevolent as it claims. For an Objectivist, this is a fat, slow pitch over the middle, so I took a swing at it. This is […]

Comments { 132 }

Shrug Trek

A Reader’s Guide to Atlas Shrugged, Part 2 Spoiler Alert: You do not need a reader’s guide to Atlas Shrugged—at least not for your first reading. Ayn Rand’s novel is clear, compelling, eminently readable, and perfectly comprehensible on its own terms. Yet Atlas is also a rich and complex novel, with an intricate plot in […]

Comments { 0 }

Flame Spotting

How to Achieve a Benevolent Sense of Life Part two of a four-part series. In the first installment of this series, I challenged the notion that a malevolent sense of life is a reaction to the uniquely bad circumstances of “today’s world,” both because sense of life is not about your momentary circumstances and because […]

Comments { 0 }

Where Is John Galt?

A Reader’s Guide to Atlas Shrugged, Part 1 You do not need a reader’s guide to Atlas Shrugged—at least not for your first reading. Atlas Shrugged is not like the Bible. The Bible is full of diversions that seem inexplicable or that don’t seem to advance the story, because their meaning has been obscured through […]

Comments { 1 }

How to Achieve a Benevolent Sense of Life

Part 1: “How to Maintain a Benevolent Sense of Life in Today’s World” Many things have been written about the appeal of Ayn Rand’s novels, but one of the central reasons for her enduring popularity and influence is her concept of a “benevolent sense of life.” Her novels are not just about striving and struggle, […]

Comments { 3 }

The University Utopia

Three Paradoxes of American Politics, Part 2 Just after November’s election, I posed three paradoxes of American politics, asking why certain demographic groups make up reliable voting blocs for the left, even though the pro-free-market ideas of the right have so much to offer them. I have begun to revisit these paradoxes. In part one […]

Comments { 4 }

Are Objectivists Libertarians?

In my RCP newsletter, I’ve been chronicling Kentucky Senator Rand Paul’s recent heroics and ascent within the Republican Party. Paul represents, not just the influence of the Tea Party, but also the growing influence of the libertarian wing of the Republican Party, which was so famously represented by his father, Ron Paul. But if the […]

Comments { 10 }

Romanticism and Realism

Top Stories of 2012: #5 This is the time I traditionally offer my overview of the top five stories of the year as covered in my newsletter. I can’t say “as covered in TIA Daily” or “as covered in The Tracinski Letter,” because the first half of the year was covered in one, the second […]

Comments { 10 }

Champions

My recent post-mortem on the Romney campaign is up at RealClearPolitics. But the point of this post-mortem is not to look backward. It is to enable us to look forward. After thinking about it a little more I can sum up the implication for the future in these terms: we desperately need champions for free […]

Comments { 0 }