Tag Archives | Constitution

Donald Trump’s One-Man Trade War

Even the New York Times has been forced to recognize the totally surprising, unexpected, and completely predictable fact that Donald Trump’s anti-regulation drive has been a big boost to the economy. One of the main reasons is an increase in certainty for businesses. Even if existing regulations are not really being rolled back, at least […]

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“The Advantage of Being Armed”

Editor’s Note: Subscribers may recognize that the article below is partially based on comments I published last year in response to a controversy within the Objectivist movement. I was motivated to expand this to a larger piece, not just because it is relevant to the wider debate right now over gun control, but also because […]

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Gerrymandering the Electorate

The events since the Parkland shooting have convinced me that we need to change the Constitution to eliminate an ill-considered Amendment that has done more harm than good. We need to repeal the 26th Amendment and raise the voting age back to 21. That’s the opposite of what a lot of people are advocating. Seeing […]

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Five Things You Need to Read Today

Here’s your weekly update, for subscribers only, drawing your attention to five stories that are worth catching. This week, the main theme is the haphazard battle to reduce the scope of government regulation. 1. The (Tax) Law of Intended Consequences I haven’t commented yet on the tax bill just passed by the Senate, because there […]

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What If Donald Trump Is Normal?

The Trump Era has brought us a campaign against a new moral crime known as “normalization.” When the New York Times published a journalistic profile of a rank-and-file white supremacist, it was accused or “normalizing Nazis.” The definition of “normalize” here seems to be: to describe an unpleasant reality in a factual manner. Apparently, nobody […]

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The Era of the Civics Lesson

It looks like this is going to have to be the era of the civics lesson, because nobody can be bothered any more to gain a basic knowledge of how our government is supposed to work and why it was designed that way. Not even the president of the United States. I know this isn’t […]

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Guns and the Monopoly on Force

The Objectivist corners of the Internet have been lit up recently by some new comments from Yaron Brook (executive director of the Ayn Rand Institute) about the Second Amendment and gun control. I’m not going to take on these comments in much detail because they strike me as offhand, flippant, and offensively arrogant—you really have […]

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The Constitution Is Foolproof, But It Isn’t Damned Fool Proof

Let’s start at the beginning: our president is a fool. President Trump has been in office long enough to demonstrate a chronic lack of elementary prudence or any shred of self-discipline. He has a knack for constantly creating crises by his own recklessness. He does things like set off totally unnecessary tensions with South Korea […]

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Is Personnel Policy?

In politics, there is an old saying: personnel is policy. What a president does is determined to a large extent by the people he hires. Consider the rumors that Donald Trump is considering appointing Mitt Romney as his Secretary of State. Trump’s stated foreign policy involves a much friendlier approach toward Russia. But he’s not […]

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Post-Mortem

Last week, I got knocked down by something that sure felt like the flu—or maybe it was just a really severe case of post-election depression. I don’t think that’s the case, though, because I was already pretty depressed before Election Day. At any rate, I’m sorry for not sending out much in the past week. […]

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