Tag Archives | didacticism

Jim Kirk Was Many Things, But He Was Never a Social Justice Warrior

It has become commonplace these days to lament that we don’t have a common culture anymore—a repertoire of art that we can all enjoy regardless of our political loyalties. Well, maybe it’s because we have a lot of people trying to mark off parts of the culture as their tribal territory, off limits to partisan […]

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Art for Whose Sake?

I’ve been tracking the growing PC didacticism of contemporary culture and some of its more extravagant recent manifestations. (That was about a music video whose status as PC propaganda has been cemented by the narrow restrictions placed on how others can reference it or comment on it.) What strikes me the most is how mainstream […]

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Weaponized Classical Music

Five Things You Need to Read Today 1. I’m Sorry, Dave, I’m Afraid I Can’t Let You Do That A while back, I warned that big Silicon Valley companies like Google depend on an implicit social contract in which we agree to let them have access to a bunch of our data, but with the […]

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The Art of Balkanization

I argued a while back that the increasingly dominant character of the art championed by our cultural elites is didacticism: “an absence of substantial or profound artistic content, compensated for by loud, didactic political messaging. We know what we’re supposed to feel, whether or not the work of art actually makes us feel it.” By […]

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Workingmen and Reformers

Five Things You Need to Read Today 1. Fighting the Last Election The Republican Party just got through a difficult party primary day in which there were several local candidates who seemed like they might win by adopting a Trumpian style, but who had severe weaknesses as general election candidates. The chief of these was […]

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The Age of Didacticism

My plan for the Culture War is that culture wins. If we have people trying to promote competing values, and we always will, at least they can promote them by creating interesting and worthwhile cultural products—art, architecture, novels, poems, movies, television, etc.—that entice us with their unique vision of how we might choose to live. […]

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