Tag Archives | higher education

Seven Liberal Pieties Only the Right Still Believes

As I’ve gotten older, I’ve increasingly had the experience of saying things that would have been considered pieties in the liberal catechism when I was young—and which now will get you labeled as a howling reactionary. In retrospect, this is partly because the left didn’t always mean some of the ideals it used to pronounce […]

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‘Privilege’ Comes Dressed in Overalls and Looks Like Work

The Left has launched a kind of free-floating cultural witch hunt aimed at uncovering and denouncing “privilege.” This has become a normal part of the indoctrination—excuse me, orientation—for new college students: to be asked to unpack an extensive list of their “privileges” and to grasp, or at least repeat back to their trainers, how guilty […]

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The Paradox of Dogma

If you try to shut down public debate, is this a way of ensuring that you win—or an admission that you have already lost? The question seems relevant today, because the most remarkable characteristic of our current national debate is that one side wants desperately to stamp it out whenever it occurs. Recently, for example, […]

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Fire Theresa Sullivan

No one is going to be fired at Rolling Stone after a disastrous report laying out their total negligence in publishing a story about a fake gang rape at the University of Virginia. But hey, we expect that from the media, and we especially expect it from a bunch of weed-smoking hippies, which is pretty much […]

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Scott Walker Presumes to Rise Above His Station

When Barack Obama was first elected president, a number of my readers were in deep despair about American politics and the state of our culture. So I set out to compile an inventory of what is still going right with our culture, the reserves of strength we were going to have to draw on to […]

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Anti-Middle-Class Economics

Well, that was quick. After less than two weeks, President Obama has dropped his plan to tax withdrawals from the “529” college savings plans widely used by middle-class parents. The proposal was never even remotely likely to see the light of day, nor was it worth debating on its merits. It was an outright money […]

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The Rungs of the Ladder

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the “War on Poverty” (announced in January of 1964) and the “Great Society” (announced 50 years ago yesterday). These were America’s two great experiments in using the power of the federal government to transform and radically improve the country. Fifty years and some 15 or 20 trillion dollars—depending […]

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Why You Can’t Work Your Way Through College Any More

You can’t work your way through college any more. That’s the conclusion of an article that sets out the figures for how long you have to work these days to pay for a year’s tuition. In effect, if you were to work long enough to pay for your tuition and room and board, you would […]

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Economics 101

The higher-education bubble has touched off a scramble among politicians to come up with solutions to make college more affordable. So far, “affordable” higher education has meant pretty much the same thing as “affordable housing”: encouraging people to pile up unsustainable government-subsidized loans. To avoid the rise of these ruinous student loans, the state of […]

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The Humanities Are Dead, Long Live the Humanities

One of the consequences of the higher-education bubble—an enormous decades-long increase in college tuition—is the withering away of majors in the humanities, from 14% of all college majors fifty years ago to 7% today. After all, if you have to spend upwards of $100,000 for an education, you probably ought to choose a field where […]

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