Tag Archives | Muslim Brotherhood

The End of ‘Islamic Democracy’

Top Stories of the Year: #4 With the beginning of the Arab Spring about three years ago, we entered the post-9/11 era—an era in which the biggest story is no longer the conflict between radical Islam and the West but instead is the Arab world’s conflict with itself. This is the year in which the […]

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The Muslim Civil War in Egypt

Here’s a good symbol of the recent turn of events in the Middle East: troops from Mali marching in a Bastille Day parade in Paris, in gratitude to the French for helping to defeat Islamists in Mali’s north. Yes, I know, Mali is not in the “Middle East.” It’s in Sub-Saharan Africa, or maybe just […]

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A Little Rebellion Now and Then

The decision by Egypt’s military to intervene and force out the country’s Islamist president has produced a lot of hand-wringing about how this is an attack on Jeffersonian democracy. The irony is that this is “democracy” in the most literal, original sense, in a way that would have been easily recognized by the Ancient Greeks […]

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Egypt’s Do-Over Revolution

A little over a week ago, I wrote about how the post-Arab Spring Middle East was entering a new phase, one in which secular liberals and their sympathizers are beginning to realize that they have to fight the Islamists with everything they can muster. On Sunday, that battle got a lot bigger, with Egyptians pouring […]

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The Lessons of Afghanistan

Here’s another very important bit of foreign policy news. I have criticized President Obama for his Hamlet act over Syria and for letting local allies support the rebels and steer money and weapons to Islamists. I thought that we hadn’t learned the big lesson of Afghanistan, where we were so eager to break the power […]

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Observations of a Bystander

Writing about foreign policy these days is an exercise in frustration, because the United States is in the unusual and unnecessary position of being a bystander to world events. The reason is that President Obama is deeply committed to a policy of inaction, or more accurately, action so halting and reluctant as to be nearly […]

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Following from in Front

Top Stories of 2012: #4 Story #4 is about America’s current foreign policy, but in this article, my goal is not to recap my previous coverage from this year but to complete it by providing an overview of the big picture. The big picture of our foreign policy is that America is following from in […]

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In the Field

Egypt’s Rebellion Against “Islamic Democracy” Back in June, I wrote an article on “The Old Regime and the Egyptian Revolution,” a takeoff of Alexis de Tocqueville’s book The Old Regime and the French Revolution, in which he described how the French Revolution failed to change the basic structure of French government, lapsing back into the […]

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The Old Regime and the Egyptian Revolution

Originally published in TIA Daily. Alexis de Tocqueville is well remembered in America for his perceptive and eloquent chronicle of our young republic, Democracy in America. But Tocqueville was interesting in studying America so that he could bring his lessons back to France, whose own experience with republicanism was, shall we say, not as felicitous. […]

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