Tag Archives | philosophy

Progressives Against Enlightenment

One of my concerns about the Trump era is that it signals a wave of anti-intellectualism on the right, a collapse in concern for basic ideas. It has also triggered something of an anti-intellectual response on the left, because Trump is the bogeyman who justifies blind, frenetic “resistance” in place of thoughtful criticism and reasoned […]

Comments are closed

Laurel and Yanny and Manny and Ayn

Every once in a while a new puzzle or paradox sweeps the Internet. A while ago it was the optical illusion of a dress that was either blue and black or gold and white, depending on who you asked. Now it’s the auditory illusion of Laurel Versus Yanny. This is a sound clip that originated […]

Comments are closed

The Enlightenment Is Not the Enemy

Jonah Goldberg has a new book out defending the “liberal”—i.e., pro-freedom—legacy of the Enlightenment, the philosophical awakening of the 18th Century. Such a defense is certainly needed in light of the Enlightenment’s wholesale rejection by today’s mainstream intellectuals. Yet this has required many others on the right to come to terms with their views of […]

Comments are closed

Communism Is Idealist

I’ve been puzzling for some time over the continuing hold of Communism on the minds of America’s intellectuals. How could a system fail so completely for so long, in so many different variations, leaving a trail of death and suffering in its wake—and still be regarded as “idealistic”? The answer is that Communism is “idealist” […]

Comments are closed

The Operation of the Moral Law

 A Reader’s Guide to Atlas Shrugged, Part 11 Spoiler Alert: You do not need a reader’s guide to Atlas Shrugged—at least not for your first reading. Ayn Rand’s novel is clear, compelling, eminently readable, and perfectly comprehensible on its own terms. Yet Atlas is also a rich and complex novel, with an intricate plot in […]

Comments are closed

Philosophers: Who Needs Them

During the 2016 Republican primaries, Senator Marco Rubio somewhat notoriously declared philosophers to be less useful than welders. No, really. He was trying to make the point that our schools should do a better job at vocational education—training welders—rather than trying to push everyone to go to college. But he went a little farther than […]

Comments are closed

Donald Trump’s Anti-Regulatory Legacy

Five Things You Need to Read Today Here is your latest update, for subscribers only, recommending five stories that are worth catching. 1. Donald Trump’s Anti-Regulatory Legacy The Trump administration’s anti-regulatory agenda continues (at least, for things that don’t directly involve international trade, which is going to be regulated like all get-out). The latest: the […]

Comments are closed

Why Won’t the Nightmare Dream of Communism Die?

Today marks the 100th anniversary of the October Revolution that set off the long global reign of terror of Communism. (For obscure reasons having to do with the outdated calendar used in Russia at the time, the October Revolution actually happened in November, and the Soviet Union traditionally celebrated it on November 7.) A century […]

Comments are closed

Philosophy Is the Handmaiden of Political Correctness

“Political Correctness Enforced on College Campus” is pretty much a “Dog Bites Man” story these days, but I just came across a new entry in the genre that is particularly interesting because it happened in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Texas at San Antonio. Philosophy departments are, in theory, supposed to be […]

Comments are closed

Five Things You Need to Read Today

Here’s your weekly update, for subscribers only, drawing your attention to five stories that are worth catching. This week, the main theme is the growth of “anti-humanism.” 1. Secular Anti-Humanism, Part 1 I remember back when conservatives used to complain about “secular humanism.” I always thought the second part, the “humanism” part, was off-base, particularly […]

Comments are closed