Tag Archives | philosophy

Why Islam Is More Violent Than Christianity

The Charlie Hebdo massacre once again has politicians and the media dancing around the question of whether there might be something a little bit special about this one particular religion, Islam, that causes its adherents to go around killing people. It is not considered acceptable in polite company to entertain this possibility. Instead, it is […]

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The Twitter Manifesto of Ben Trovato

It was inevitable. Once I dragged Ben Trovato—the mysterious King of the Narrative—into public notice, it was only a matter of time before he started his own Twitter feed. Incidentally, I did a little research and found that there are a couple of different folks out there operating under the name “Ben Trovato”—a humor columnist […]

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Whydunit

A Reader’s Guide to Atlas Shrugged, Part 6 Spoiler Alert: You do not need a reader’s guide to Atlas Shrugged—at least not for your first reading. Ayn Rand’s novel is clear, compelling, eminently readable, and perfectly comprehensible on its own terms. Yet Atlas is also a rich and complex novel, with an intricate plot in […]

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What the Right Can Learn from Ayn Rand

In The Federalist, Hunter Baker recently argued that conservatives should approach the ideas of Ayn Rand with a little more “Christian charity,” and that they should reverse the attempt by William F. Buckley and Whittaker Chambers, decades ago, to drum Ayn Rand out of the right. I have a few quibbles with this piece, but […]

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Anti-Science and Anti-Intellectual

Sean Davis’s work at The Federalist documenting Neil deGrasse Tyson’s tendency to make up quotes and examples to fit his narrative has gotten some notice in an article at The Daily Beast. While the article itself is fair and nicely balanced, the subtitle the editors gave it, which speculates that criticism of Tyson might be […]

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Crucial New Ideas That Are Not Hers

I recently published a commentary on how certain basic ideas about how to organize the Objectivist movement that were formulated in the 1980s have begun to fall away, implicitly rejected even by those who used to advocate them. Of those ideas, the only one on which I have seen any real debate is the question […]

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The Children of Tama

So Senate Democrats held their all-night talkathon on global warming. Which might itself be considered a contribution to global warming, in the form of a massive emission of hot air. This all-night session took the outward form of legislative action—a filibuster, perhaps, or the kind of late-night session in which the Senate passed ObamaCare—but without […]

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I Believe It Because It Is Absurd

You have no doubt seen those “one weird trick” ads that have spread like a cancer across the Web. In case you were wondering about why you see them everywhere, an intrepid reporter bravely clicked on them and tracked down how they work, why they work, and who is behind them. Here is what he […]

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“Rational Quantum Dynamics, Were Such a Thing to Exist”

For most of the last century, the achievements of physics were used to prop up the failures of the humanities. Quantum physics was endlessly interpreted (and abused) to provide a supposed scientific confirmation for irrationalist and mystical doctrines. The latest discoveries of science, it was said, confirmed that knowledge is impossible, that we can achieve […]

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There’s Nobody as Dumb as a Smart Person

The problem with a reductio ad absurdum argument is that sometimes your opponent accepts the absurdity and just runs with it. When smokers were suing cigarette companies and the FDA was proposing to regulate tobacco, we thought it was a devastating retort to say, “What next, are they going to sue fast food restaurants and […]

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