Tag Archives | science

Bill Nye the Anti-Science Guy

I’ve never been a fan of Bill Nye “the Science Guy.” Partly it’s because I’m from a different generation. I grew up with Isaac Asimov and Carl Sagan as my introduction to science, and Nye always struck me as a cheap substitute. I find something condescending in his hyperkinetic manner, as if science couldn’t actually […]

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Global Warming, Mass Extinction, and Bigfoot

The earth is warming and we’re all gonna die! Is that a crude, exaggerated caricature of global warming alarmism? Yes, and it’s also the actual claim global warming alarmists are making. I can’t help it if they’ve become caricatures of themselves. Hence the latest dire warning that we are, indeed, all going to die. Specifically, […]

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It’s Not the Crime, It’s the Cover-Up

The Neil deGrasse Tyson kerfuffle has reached a conclusion of sorts. To recap, The Federalist‘s Sean Davis has done some good old-fashioned, dogged reporting and tracked down a list of dubious examples commonly used by science popularizer Neil deGrasse Tyson, the unvarying effect of which is to make Tyson and his listeners feels smart and to […]

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What I Learned from the Geeks

You know how old I am? I’m so old I can remember when “geek” was still an insult. Today, of course, it’s a boast. It has become cool to be a geek, precisely because so many people who had that insult thrown at them went on to do big, important things—and generate billion-dollar fortunes along […]

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Anti-Science and Anti-Intellectual

Sean Davis’s work at The Federalist documenting Neil deGrasse Tyson’s tendency to make up quotes and examples to fit his narrative has gotten some notice in an article at The Daily Beast. While the article itself is fair and nicely balanced, the subtitle the editors gave it, which speculates that criticism of Tyson might be […]

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The Metaphysical Dilemma of the Left

The recent Neil deGrasse Tyson kerfuffle and the dogmatic defense of the global warming consensus raises the question: what’s the impetus? Why do people feel the need to proclaim themselves so loudly as the pro-science side of the debate and to write off all opponents as anti-science? What makes scientists so susceptible to a cultural […]

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Science Is as Science Does

I have to admit that I missed out on the ascendancy of Neil deGrasse Tyson. In my era, the nation’s beloved “scientific communicator” was Carl Sagan. And he had many of the same flaws. As I’ve written about elsewhere, Sagan spoke eloquently about need to follow the evidence wherever it goes, without regard for your […]

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Is the Right Good for Atheism?

I recently argued that atheists such as myself can be good for the right by decoupling a political agenda of liberty and constitutionalism from association with any kind of narrower religious base—in effect, telling people that they don’t have to embrace creationism or foreswear birth control to join the cause. Instead, the religious and the […]

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What Atheists Have to Offer the Right

Conservative writer and CNN talking head S.E. Cupp recently put out a video describing how she has been welcomed among conservatives even though she is an atheist. This led Hot Air’s Allahpundit to chime in with his own experiences, citing myself and National Review‘s Charles Cooke as other examples of atheists on the right. And […]

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The Fix Is In

“Peer review” is an important aspect of the scientific method. Any scientific claim should face basic scrutiny from other experts in the field in order to weed out clearly invalid or unscientific arguments. But peer review is also open to some obvious abuses. An entrenched scientific establishment can use peer review to close ranks against […]

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